Sunday, February 26, 2012

Royal Blue CTPK F1 (Doxy)


I posted this spawn earlier under CTPK X HMPK. Here is the best male. Right now he's in the spawn tank with his sister.

A quick video to give an idea of this little guy. Ignore the sound, I was watching TV and forgot it would record that too!



video

Sister of the male

Copper CTPK (F4) x Copper (F3)

Hi all,
parallel to my other copper ctpk spawn I took a other pair to start a second line to change later between the lines. I hope to get better quality in the webbing, special in the caudale. Now I can show only pictures of the parents because my camera case is damaged and I must wait until she is fixed.
Now I have 8 youngsters which are 1,5 months old and it looks like, that the most are shortfins, too.
I took two different lines, so I get a new F1 generation of youngsters.

Female F3 own spawn

Male F4 own spawn

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Bettas4All CTPK Standard Part Two

Hi friends,
Iam happy to present here the first version of a ctpk standard. Joep van Esch and his friends are working for this project hard, and it will be updated in the future. Until yet we had no own ctpk class in any shows, because we had no ctpk breeder which shows her ctpk´s on shows. Last year I start with my first ctpk on IBC, EHBBC and Bettas4All Shows and I hope a lot of breeder will follow me in the future.

Chapter 3H-II: Finnage Characteristics – Crowntail Plakat

Under Construction
Figure 3H-II.1 2D representation of the 3D model of the ideal crowntail plakat (created by Stefan George Psarakos).1.

1. General appearance

1.1 Condition
As in all other show betta (see Chapter 3).

1.2 Deportment
As in all other show betta (see Chapter 3).

1.3 Overall balance
The ideal crowntail has a symmetrical appearance which can be demonstrated by an imaginary horizontal midline which shows that the upper and lower part of the fish nearly form a mirror-image (see Figure 3H-II.2). The contour of the ideal crowntail plakat fits an oval of which the width is approximately 1.5-times the height. The outer rim of the unpaired fins follows the contours of the oval in a smooth way without any irregularities. Ideally the anal fin and dorsal fin should not extend beyond the bottom edge and upper edge of the caudal fin, respectively.

Under Construction
Figure 3H-II.2 The contour of the ideal crowntail plakat fits an oval. The horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) midlines as well as vertical lines A-E are used to describe the proportions of the ideal crowntail plakat.

The vertical line which runs through the point on the body where the outer rays of the caudal fin are attached (C), divides the total length of the crowntail plakat (A-E) into two parts, A-C and C-E, with a ~75/25 distribution respectively (see Figure 3H-II.2). An important point with respect to overall balance is that the finnage must be in proportion with the body. The width of the anal fin (B-C) is used as an important marker to indicate the desired proportions (see Figure 3H-II.3). In the ideal situation the length of the rays of the caudal fin, which extend from the peduncle (D) to the outer rim (E), are equal to 1/2 of the width of the anal fin (B-C). When an imaginary vertical midline would be drawn, the vertical length of the dorsal and anal fin from the body to the outer rim is again equal to 1/2 of the width of the anal fin. The length of the ventral fins from the point where they are attached to the body to the tip is equal to 1/2 to 2/3 of the width of the anal fin (B-C).

Under Construction
Figure 3H-II.3 The width of the anal fin (B-C) is an important marker to demonstrate proportion.

2. Body

2.1 Form & dimension
As in all other show betta (see Chapter 3 and Figure 3H-II.4).

Under Construction
Figure 3H-II.4 Ideal body shape form & dimension of the crowntail plakat.

2.2. Scalation
As in all other show betta (see Chapter 3).

3. Finnage

3.1 Caudal fin
The ideal crowntail caudal is “double-ray (DR)” and shows a primary branching (2-ray) with a 40% reduction in webbing between the primary rays and a 20% reduction between the secondary rays thereby creating a crown-like appearance. The protruding rays ideally should be thick and straight (with exception of the crossray variants as described below). The branching of the rays should be evenly distributed throughout the caudal fin. The overall form of the caudal fin of the crowntail can be compared with a the shape of a capital letter “D” (see Figure 3H-II.5, left). The caudal fin has a symmetrical appearance which means that it could be divided into two equal parts which are a mirror-images of each other across a horizontal midline (X). The ideal caudal fin has a 180-degree spread, straight rays and sharp corners. A spread of more than 180-degrees is not preferred over a 180-degree spread. The caudal fin has 12-13 primary rays which extend from the peduncle. The webbing of the caudal fin has a smooth appearance without any overlapping/folding parts due to excessive branching and/or webbing.

Under Construction
Figure 3H-II.5 Ideal form of the caudal fin (left) and dorsal fin (right) of the crowntail plakat.

3.2 Dorsal fin
The dorsal fin of the crowntail plakat shows a 40% reduction in webbing between the rays thereby creating a crown-like appearance. The protruding rays ideally should be thick and straight without any branching. The dorsal snaps open like a fan and has the shape of a modified scalene trapezoid (see Figure 3H-II.5, right). Ideally the base of the dorsal fin should be equal to 2/3 of the width of the anal fin (B-C). The rays in the front of the dorsal must be slighlty directed forward, and the back of the dorsal fin overlaps the upper part of the caudal. Overlap of the back of the dorsal fin with the body is not desirable. The webbing of the dorsal fin has a smooth appearance without any overlapping/folding parts due to excessive branching and/or webbing.

3.3 Anal fin
The anal fin of the crowntail plakat shows a 40% reduction in webbing between the primary rays thereby creating a crown-like appearance. The protruding rays ideally should be thick and straight without any branching. The anal fin of the crowntail starts at the thickest point of the body (B) and has the shape of a modified scalene trapezium (see Figure 3H-II.6, right). The anal fin runs approximately parallel to the body. The length of the rays in the back of the anal fin match those of the caudal fin but the length of the rays slightly declines towards the front. During flaring the front of the anal is directed forward and the back overlaps the lower part of the caudal. The volume and the capacity of the anal fin to open up during flaring is achieved by a moderate branching of the fin-rays (mainly primary raysplitting although secondary raysplitting sometimes also can be observed). The webbing of the anal fin has a smooth appearance without any overlapping/folding parts due to excessive branching and/or webbing.

3.4 Ventral fins
The form of the ventrals fins of a crowntail plakat is as in all other show betta (see Chapter 3). Additionally, the ventrals of the crowntail plakat should have a full volume with a clearly jagged appearance (see Figure 3H-II.6, left).

3.5 Pectoral fins
As in all other show betta (see Chapter 3 and Figure 3C.6, right). The pectoral fins of the crowntail plakat are D-shaped with primary (2-ray) branching with a clearly jagged appearance.

Under Construction
Figure 3H-II.6 Ideal form of the ventral & pectoral fins (left) and anal fin (right) of the crowntail plakat.

Image
Figure 3H-II.7 Examples of crowntail plakat males
(A) Truong Phu Thanh (Cedric; Vietnam), (B) was bred by Vinita Tippimul (Nicebettas; Thailand) and (C) was bred by Daniella Vereeken (Belgium)
Please note that these fish are examples and still exhibit points requiring improvement.


It is not allowed to copy, translate or use the content of this standard without permission of the author.

 

Bettas4All CTPK Standard Part One

Hi friends,
very important for all Betta breeder and of course for ctpk breeding are different informations. At first you find here informations for General Characterisitcs. Iam happy that Joep give me the ok to show this part of the standard here. Thanks Joep.

Chapter 3: General Characteristics

Chapter 3 of the Bettas4all Standard describes the general characteristics that all show betta should possess regardless of their fin and/or color variety.

General remark:
Hobbyists are only allowed to register fish for the competition that are bred by the hobbyist him/herself. All fish have to be shown in clear water that is not colored by any additives such as banana and/or Indian almond leaves.

1. Anatomy
Figure 3.1 shows a general overview of the anatomical features a male and female show betta should possess according to the Bettas4all standard. There should be a clear distinction between male and female bettas of the various finnage varieties. The ideal size and shape of the different parts will be discussed in the different parts of the standard.

Image
Figure 3.1 Betta anatomy.

2. Overall appearance
The general appearance of a show betta is determined by its condition, deportment and overall balance.

2.1 Condition
A show betta needs to be in good condition. Condition refers to the health and state of the body and finnage, which contribute to the overall appearance of the show betta. Ideally the fish should appear well nourished and vigorous without any damage to the body or finnage.

2.2 Deportment
Deportment refers to the behaviour of the fish. A show betta ideally presents itself by actively swimming throughout the whole tank (up and down, forward and backward). The fish flares actively to its own mirror image or, when uncarded, to neighbouring fish within the same show class. During flaring the gill membrane and gill cover on each side of the head are opened, the three unpaired fins (anal, dorsal and caudal fin) are fully spread and the ventral fins are directed forward. Females usually are slightly less aggressive than their male counterparts.
An important note with respect to judging deportment is the fact that this can vary from time to time. All entrants have to keep in mind that the judging is done at a specific time point of the show and that the show betta must be judged according to its performance at this timepoint. Each show betta has to be given the chance to show itself to another fish from the same class and/or its mirror-image. Each fish must respond within 3 minutes (timed with stopwatch).

2.3 Overall balance
Independent of the finnage variety, the general appearance of a show betta must be balanced. In general this means that the finnage has to be in proportion with the body in such a way that it does not interfere with the swimming abilities of the fish. The ideal proportion between body and finnage differs between the different fin varieties and therefore is described in more detail in the different standards (see Chapter 3A–3H).

3. Body
The body of a show betta is determined by its form, dimension and scalation.

3.1 Form & Dimension
The minimum body size for a show betta is 3.5 cm for a male and 3 cm for female. The form of the body is that of a modified ellipsoid. The “mouth-to-dorsal” and “dorsal-to-peduncle” toplines should be smoothly curved without dips and bumps (see Figure 3.3).

Image
Figure 3.2 Toplines of a showbetta.

The thickest part of the body (alpha) is located at the place where the vertical midline (B) intercepts the horizontal midline (X) and thereby crosses the point of the body where the front of the anal fin starts (see Figure 3.3). The vertical midline (B) divides the total body length (A-D) into two parts with a 40/60 percent distribution. The front part (A-B), compromises approximately 40 percent of the total body length and contains most of the internal organs. In females, the belly area is slightly more rounded than in males with the ovipositor situated at the part just before the front of the anal fin starts (B). The mouth and the eyes are located slightly below the horizontal midline (X). The pupil and iris of the eyes should be clearly visible. The back part (B-D) compromises the remaining 60 percent of the total surface area of the body and contains the spine and swim bladder. The back part of the body gradually tapers from alpha to the the peduncle and is nearly symmetrical on both sides of the horizontal midline (X). The height of the body at the peduncle (Bèta) is equal to ~0.6-times alpha in males and ~0.5-times alpha in females. (see Chapter 3A–3H). Here it is important to note that the female body is not as thick as the male body at alpha.

Image
Figure 3.3 Ideal body form & dimension of a show betta.

When judged from above, the spine should be straight without any distinct curvatures, dips and/or bumps. During flaring the gill membrane and gill cover on each side of the head are opened and displayed (see Figure 3.4). This happens in both male and female bettas but in males the gill membrane is larger.

Image
Figure 3.4 Example of a betta male opening his gill membrane and covers during flaring.

3.2 Scalation
In general, the scalation on the entire body should be nicely aligned in a symmetrical way leading to a solid appearance. On the back part of the body, each individual scale should be approximately of the same form and size. On the head, the scales are a bit smaller.

4. Finnage
The finnage of a show betta is determined by the the form & dimension of the unpaired (the caudal fin, dorsal fin and anal fin) and the paired (ventral fins and pectoral fins) fins. Please note that the width of the anal fin (B-C) is used as an important marker to indicate the desired proportions & dimensions of the finnage in the Bettas4all Standard (see Figure 3.5).

Image
Figure 3.5: The breadth of the anal fin is used as a reference point to describe the ideal dimensions of the finnage.

4.1 Caudal fin
The caudal fin, or tail fin, is extends from the end of the caudal peduncle. The caudal fin is used for propulsion. The ideal dimensions of the caudal fin differ among the different fin varieties and therefore is described in more detail in the different standards (see Chapter 3A–3H).

4.2 Dorsal fin
The dorsal fin is located on the posterior dorsal surface of the fish. The dorsal fin serves to protect the fish against rolling and assists in sudden turns. The ideal dimensions of the dorsal fin differ among the different fin varieties and therefore are described in more detail in the standards which describe these varieties (see Chapter 3A–3H).

4.3 Anal fin
The anal fin is located on the ventral surface behind the anus. The anal fin is used to stabilize the fish while swimming. The ideal dimensions of the anal fin differ among the different fin varieties and therefore are described in more detail in the standards which describe these varieties (see Chapter 3A–3H).

4.4 Ventral fins
The ventral fins are important in swimming and maintaining balance in the water. The shape of the ventral fins mimic the blade of a knife with the cutting edge directed backwards. The ventrals are equal in length and size and run down into a single tip. During flaring the ventral fins are directed forward and ideally should not cross each other. The ideal dimensions of the ventral fins differ among the different fin varieties and therefore are described in more detail in the standards which describe these varieties (see Chapter 3A–3H).

4.5 Pectoral fins
The pectoral fins control the up-and-down motion as well as the side-to-side motion and rolling of the body. The pectoral fins can be held close to the body to increase speed by reducing drag, or they can be extended to increase drag and serve as a brake. The pectoral fins are equal in length and size. The ideal dimensions of the pectoral fins differ among the different fin varieties and therefore are described in more detail in the standards which describe these varieties (see Chapter 3A–3H).

5. Disqualifying faults
1. The fish which are entered are not bred by the hobbyist who registered the fish for the Bettas4all show (Disqualification).
2. Undersized fish:
- Males with a body size under 3.5 cm (Disqualification).
- Females with a body size under 3 cm (Disqualification).
3. Any sign of disease: Protruding scales, clamped/sticky fins, finrot, popeye, egg-bound females, etc. (Disqualification).
4. Absence of an anatomical part of the fish (eye, gill membrane, gill cover, finnage etc.) (Disqualification).
5. Malformations of the body:
- Crooked spine (Disqualification).
- Extreme spoonhead (Disqualification).
- Disfigurement of the lips (Disqualification).
- Extremely deformed scalation (> 3 misaligned scales) (Disqualification).
- Blindness or so-called “alien-eyes” (dense layer of colour over the eye obscuring the iris, often associated with metallic/opaque) (Disqualification).
6. Finnage/balance:
- Extreme fin damage: Missing part of a fin, more than one split/tear in any of the fins, >4 pinholes in the finnage (Disqualification).
- Extreme ray branching (Disqualification).
- Extreme balloon webbing (Disqualification).
- Fused fins (Disqualification).
- Multiple ventral tips: > 4 tips in at least one ventral fin (Disqualification).
- Extreme fin-curling (Disqualification).
- Extreme imbalance due to disproportionate length of the unpaired fins (Disqualification).
- Extreme masculine finnage on a female (Disqualification).
7. Inability to swim properly (Disqualification).
8. Inactivity/fearful behaviour, the fish does not rise from the tank bottom or does not flare (within 3 minutes) (Disqualification).
9. Males with an “egg-spot” and females without an “egg-spot” (Disqualification).
10. Cut finnage (Disqualification).

It is not allowed to copy, translate or use the content of this standard without permission of the author.

CT

Is this a good male to start breeding?


Abraços

Rui M.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Standard CTPK Philippines.

Walking on Facebook, I found an image that looks like a standard CTPK, the image is of Asian Betta Alliance (ABA) from Philippines, they call hspk standard (half sun plakat). 




After finding this picture I started researching to find information about the CTPK, try entering your forum, but it's time to not get an answer.



Thanks to betta ph for letting me use this image, belonging to Asian Betta Alliance (ABA) from Philippines

I hope this help in some way in the search for CTPK.

Credits:
Image- Asian Betta Alliance (ABA)

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Greetings from Mexico


For me it is an honor that I accept in this community.

I am currently starting my search for the PKCT.
I maintain a HMPK Line Blue Dragon has given me several very good specimens. And I hope my experience serves Selective Breeding for achieving this new project.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Happy to join the international CTPK project

As soon as I understand how this works I will post the photos and the spawns of my CTPK project. I just had an F3 last week, I hope I've been lucky!

Cheers,

Eugenio from Italy